Remove the home ump

from making calls on balls and strikes?

Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel took a look at it.

While Major League Baseball claims that its umpires get nearly 97% of the calls right… Professor Moskowitz found that since 2013 the umpires are actually only about 88% accurate… that they get 1 out of every 8 calls wrong… piling up more than 30,000 mistakes a year. 

 And that’s including the easy calls… the many pitches that go right down the middle… or way off the plate… that scarcely require a decision.

When the umps have to actually make a decision … when the pitches are anywhere near the border of the strike zone … they miss at an even higher rate… much higher.

Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel segment investigated this technology and its place in the game. The full show is available on HBO Go, HBO Now and HBO On-Demand.

The interesting parts of this show are the interviews with umpire Jerry Crawford. Even though the league thinks they are tutoring umpires on how to get the calls correct, the umpires may be turning a deaf ear to these attempts. According to ex-umpire Jerry Crawford the umpires are simply throwing away the information. At least that is what his group of umpires did. If that is true for a majority of crews, that is some arrogant shit going on.

I never thought I’d want to get rid of the home umpire but after watching how successful the replay system is, I’m beginning to waver. I think they need to fix a few things, I think being safe is beating the throw to the bag before the tag or force, and is not rising off the bag for a split second. Some agree, some don’t.

I like human interaction in the game, but if the umpires aren’t interested in getting better, maybe they should find umpires who are or possibly go full boar with the ball/strike technology.

It does seem strange now to watch a game knowing full well if a pitch was a ball or strike but the hitter or umpire do not.   If they do switch to the technology will they show the box on the big screen after every pitch?

Might be a game changer in terms of viewing the game live.

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4 Comments

  1. 68elcamino427

    The horse and buggy was finally replaced by the automobile.
    Then man traveled to outer space.

    The umpire has been overruled by instant replay.
    The need for an automated strike zone is just too obvious.

    Too much money is on the line now to justify leaving the outcomes of balls, strikes, at bats, and the outcomes of games in the hands of a man behind the plate when the technology that can do a near perfect job is available instead.

    Heck, if we have cars that require no driver …

    Like

  2. Yup, 21st century

    Like

  3. 68elcamino427

    So, here I am on a post from the 12th, really, really wishing that I truly had the power to turn back time.
    Because on the morning of the 13th, not long after awakening we received a phone call with the news that Jenny’s eighty-five year old dad was found unresponsive in his bed and 911 was on the way.
    At the hospital they determined that he had suffered a massive heart attack, a stroke that paralysed his right side, and he has pneumonia in his right lung too. Boom.so now he lays in a hospital bed, clinging to life.
    Such a nice man, and still working at his job shuttling rental cars up until about a month ago.
    Even though I only spent real time with him on a few occasions, he taught me quite a bit.
    The last time that I saw him was a couple of months ago at the funeral for his older sister.She was a peach, such a lovely woman with a very warm heart.
    The last thing I said to Phelps was a request as I was saying goodbye for the day. I gave him a big hug and as we embraced, I asked him just to please let me know if there was anything he needed. He gave me a kiss on the cheek and said, “Don’t worry, I’m ok.”

    Phelps grew up outside San Antonio on a dusty farm in Texas. Father black, mom Mexican, some Caucasian mixed in too. What a neat guy he is. Gonna miss him when he’s gone.

    Like

  4. Sorry to hear Gary, he sounded like a great guy who lived a great life.

    Like

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